American Historical Site- Old St. Louis Courthouse

St. Louis is a remarkably important city.  While we may not immediately think of it like that now here in the early 21st century (aside from the Cardinals of course) it was vastly important in the 19th century.  Situated as it is at the junction of the Missouri and Mississippi rivers it long competed with Chicago as the primary shipping point in the mid west.  Lewis and Clark followed the Missouri westwards on their long trek towards the Pacific, and followed it again eastwards when they crossed back over the Rockies, and Lewis settled in St. Louis when he returned as  Louisiana territorial governor (remember that all of the Louisiana purchase was seen as one territory for several years).  Perhaps the most widely important event in St. Louis in the 19th century however was the Dred Scott Decision. Well, strictly speaking the trial that led to the Decision, since the Decision was made by the Supreme Court in Washington DC.  Read the caption to the photograph to get a basic overview of the case.

Surrounded by modern sky scrapers the Old Court House in St Louis Missouri is reflected in the glass of one of the modern buildings. The Old Court House is best known as the site of the Dred Scott case, and is part of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial of the National Park Service. The Dred Scott Decision was a major turning point in the abolition movement in the years leading up to the American Civil War. Not only did the case prevent Scott from being rightfully freed, it also effectively stripped all persons of African decent of citizenship in the United States including all free African Americans living in in the United States (remember there were large free Black populations in many northern states). The decision was nullified by the 14th Amendment to the Constitution. Scott himself was eventually freed later that year through a complicated series of events involving contracts between various white slave owners. Sadly he died only 17 months after being freed having succumbed to TB.

Surrounded by modern sky scrapers the Old Court House in St Louis Missouri is reflected in the glass of one of the modern buildings. The Old Court House is best known as the site of the Dred Scott case, and is part of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial of the National Park Service. The Dred Scott Decision was a major turning point in the abolition movement in the years leading up to the American Civil War. Not only did the case prevent Scott from being rightfully freed, it also effectively stripped all persons of African decent of citizenship in the United States including all free African Americans living in in the United States (remember there were large free Black populations in many northern states). The decision was nullified by the 14th Amendment to the Constitution. Scott himself was eventually freed later that year through a complicated series of events involving contracts between various white slave owners. Sadly he died only 17 months after being freed having succumbed to TB.

This image and all my other images of American Historical Sites can be found here:  http://joshua-house.artistwebsites.com/art/all/american+historical+sites/all

Remember, the 15% discount is still in effect until the 31st  enter the code GZPGNB at checkout.

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