Pickett’s Charge

 

When I was about eleven, and my brother was eight, our family watched the entirety of Ken Burns “The Civil War” on VHS in a week, in preparation for a trip from Allentown down to Gettysburg. I was familiar with the Civil War already, from school and just an interest in history over all.  This was long before the film Gettysburg had been released, and I’d not read “The Killer Angels”.  We visited Big and Little Round Top, and went up the various observation towers (including the private, Space Needle style one that has since been removed).  When we reached the hottest point of the day dad brought us to the starting point of the Confederate forces during Pickett’s Charge.  Dad pointed across the fields towards the Union lines, and said, that’s where we’re going.  When we’d reached the effective range of rifle fire he told us that we had to run the rest of the way to the Copse of Trees.  The photos below give you some idea of just how long the distance between the lines was.

Across this field and series of fence lines the Confederate Army attempted to advance to the top of the distant ridge while facing the withering fire of the Union forces deployed along the ridge. This is the site of Pickett's Charge, the high tide of the Confederacy, and in many ways the final hope of the CSA to achieve independence.

Across this field and series of fence lines the Confederate Army attempted to advance to the top of the distant ridge while facing the withering fire of the Union forces deployed along the ridge. This is the site of Pickett’s Charge, the high tide of the Confederacy, and in many ways the final hope of the CSA to achieve independence.

The fence and stone wall at the western edge of “The Angle” on the battle field at Gettysburg. It was into this area that the North Carolinians and Mississippians advanced during Pickett’s charge before having to retreat to the distant line of trees along Seminary Ridge. Part way across the field is the Codroi farm along the Emmitsburg Road.

The fence and stone wall at the western edge of “The Angle” on the battle field at Gettysburg. It was into this area that the North Carolinians and Mississippians advanced during Pickett’s charge before having to retreat to the distant line of trees along Seminary Ridge. Part way across the field is the Codroi farm along the Emmitsburg Road.

To see these and other images from Gettysburg please visit my Gettysburg gallery on my website.  http://joshua-house.artistwebsites.com/art/all/gettysburg/all

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This entry was posted in American Historic Sites, American History, gettysburg, Monuments and Memorials, Photography- Panoramas and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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