Adirondack Lean-to Photo Set

Lean-tos are an important part of camping in the Adirondacks and many other parts  of the Eastern United States.  As a shelter, and as a gathering point they have a unique place in the hearts of many campers and backpackers, and should be treated with great respect.  Most contain a log (and they’re all meant to) that will allow you to know how often it’s used, and is also helpful in finding lost hikers.  Many a night a backpackers have read through the comments in a lean-to log learning what other backpackers have seen and experienced, as well as possible trail conditions ahead of them.  Most lean-tos also have an outhouse or box toilet associated with them, giving a backpacker the chance to “do their business” without having to dig a cathole which can be a welcome change.

Just who maintains all these lean-tos?  There are numerous individuals across the Adirondacks who have adopted lean-tos and pack minor supplies and TP out to them on a regular basis often associated with the Adirondack Mountain Club.  In some cases you will find an amazing assortment of supplies that a volunteer has left at a lean-to for backpackers to use, including matches and lighters, kindling, firewood, paperback novels, occasionally tracts or New Testaments.

The  Five Mile Mountain Lean-to with my daypack and the gallon ZipLock that the GPS and Radio rode in.

The Five Mile Mountain Lean-to with my daypack and the gallon ZipLock that the GPS and Radio rode in.

 

Fishbrook Pond actually has two very nice lean-tos almost directly across from each other.  Trails circle the pond.

Fishbrook Pond actually has two very nice lean-tos almost directly across from each other. Trails circle the pond.

The other lean-to on Fishbrook pond.

The other lean-to on Fishbrook pond.

The Lean-to at Lapland Pond.  This may have been the buggiest place I visited in the Daks.

The Lean-to at Lapland Pond. This may have been the buggiest place I visited in the Daks.

The Millman Pond Lean-to, sometimes called the Taj-Mahal due to the level of care shown by it's volunteer caretaker.

The Millman Pond Lean-to, sometimes called the Taj-Mahal due to the level of care shown by it’s volunteer caretaker.  The four nights I spent here got as low as about 28 degrees, and it was the only time I built an actual fire the whole summer.  That 28 degrees was in early June.

 

 

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