Rain and Rainbows in the West

In response to The Daily Post’s writing prompt: “ROY G. BIV.”

I lived in the West for several years, in both Flagstaff Arizona and Moffat County Colorado.  Flagstaff is at ~7000 feet above sea level and is very dependent on winter snows and monsoon rains in the summer for its water table.  A century ago there was snow on the San Francisco Peaks throughout the year, now it is gone by May.  The small town I lived in in Moffat County is about 6000 feet above sea level and is also very dependent on snow and summer rains.

Flagstaff is a modern city of about 70000 people that is driven economically by Northern Arizona University and being the largest city near Grand Canyon National Park.  Moffat County on the other hand has a population of about 13000 and is slightly smaller then the state of Connecticut.  Moffat County’s economy is much more typical of what is often thought of as “The West”, namely ranching, oil/gas/mineral extraction, and to a lesser extent farming along parts of the Yampa River.

My 6 months in Moffat County went from the last snow of Spring to the first snows of Winter and through the monsoon season in August.  Monsoon brings needed rain, less needed lightning, and of course rainbows.  Because I lived in Dinosaur I generally went to Vernal Utah groceries, to visit the library, and occasionally go out to dinner while over there, about 35 miles each way.  The image below came from one of those trips to Vernal, on the way back a brief downpour overtook me and I pulled off to the side of US 40 allowed the storm to pass and was blessed with the sight of the rainbow you see below.

Copyright Joshua House 2011

A rainbow reaches down near sunset along the western range lands of Colorado beside US 40.

http://joshua-house.artistwebsites.com/featured/colorado-rainbow-joshua-house.html

http://joshua-house.artistwebsites.com/art/all/all/all/colorado

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